Great Space Saving Home Gym Inspiration

By The Garden Room Guy | Build

Want a home gym but don’t have much space? Then check this great space saving home gym inspiration, and create yourself a home gym in the smallest of spaces.

Living in London, space is a premium luxury that comes at a high cost. That’s why I made my own home gym as compact as possible. At 8x10ft it’s very much on the smallest end of the scale for a weights-specific gym. With a squat rack and bench in there there isn’t much more you could squeeze in. So let’s look at how other people have managed to cram in their gym equipment into the smallest of spaces – let’s celebrate these tiny home gyms!

First up is this metal garage transformation…

 

1) THE METAL SHED HOME GYM

This gym looks like it’s got the lot. I’m guessing that it’s original purpose was a car garage, so it’s probably about 10ft wide by at least 16ft-18ft long.  One common problem with repurposing outbuildings such as garages and sheds into a home gym is the low roof heights. This metal garage doesn’t seem to have that issue at all though, being around 9ft (guesstimate) at the eaves, and rising another foot or so at the roof peak. This means they’ve been able to comfortably fit in a full Power Rack and subsequently be able to perform chin-ups on it.

One big problem with metal sheds/garages however is with extremes of temperature. Metal has no thermal retention properties, so in the winter it’s going to be incredibly cold in there. And in the summer it’ll be like working out in an oven at gas mark 10 (hot!). I’m not sure where this particular home gym is, but anywhere where you’ve got temperature extremes, like in the UK and most of the US, you’re going to need insulation to keep you warm/cool. I suppose having two retractable doors helps with the airflow though. 🙂

One other thing to not is the concrete base which would be your best bet with this type of building, making it super solid and also allowing you to reliably affix your equipment down, like power racks and weight trees, should you want to.

 

 

2) THE BASIC SHED GYM

This little ghetto gym is probably a 8ft x 10ft wooden overlap shed (like mine). The gear here is more for basic crossfit purposes. Some decent heavy-duty rubber floor matting will keep the wooden floor protected from the pounding it’ll get from those kettlebells and barbell. It looks like a gym is this shed’s sole purpose.

I probably wouldn’t want to swing that sledgehammer around in there though and chin ups might give you a headache when you bang your head on the roof.

It could also do with a bit of insulation on the walls and ceiling.

 

3) THE GARAGE HOME GYM

This is a good-sized, solid gym. Again, probably 12ft wide and 18ft long (to originally accommodate a car) you’d have plenty of room for all your equipment. This one features a built-in Power Rack cage, which seems to be attached to the ceiling joists, back wall and floor, providing a solid base to train.

 

4) THE COMPACT SHED GYM

This little man-cave of a gym features an adjustable squat stand which allows you to also bench press. It wouldn’t be as safe as a full-on Power Rack or Squat Rack, and you wouldn’t want to push yourself too hard with this setup as it could get a little wobbly. It could do with a few more lights in there too so you can see what you’re doing.

Send me some photos of your own compact home gym, as i’d love to see them and add to the site!

About the Author

I'm the Garden Room Guy. Or as most people know me, Sef. I started this blog to document my own garden room project. If it helps you at all, please let me know! Sef

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